Detroit Pistons forward Jonas Jerebko’s rehab after ankle injury is looking up

Auburn Hills, Michigan – Well, Jonas Jerebko is still tall.

After Jerebko has missed most of the season – and still more games on the sideline to come – with a partially ruptured Achilles tendon, we don’t know how his offensive rebounding, transition defense and efficient shooting will look when he finally returns.

But he still possesses the 6-foot-10 frame that has NBA followers excited about his future in the league. That was abundantly clear when Alana M. Glass of I Want to be an Owner – who wore a protective boot and crutches – introduced herself to Jerebko by saying, “You and I have something in common. I’ll give you one guess.”

Jerebko returned a blank stare. Towering over the 5-foot-7 Glass, he hadn’t noticed her lower-body injury and subsequent equipment.

Although Jerebko’s powers of observation when it relates to the normal-sized of us is lacking, his eagerness to return to the court certainly isn’t. Asked about his timeline, Jerebko initially said he didn’t have one. Then, he clarified.

“Of course, I’ve got a timeline in my head,” Jerebko said. “But I’m already past that one.”

Jerebko seemed to walk well last night, but there’s obviously a big difference between walking and playing in the NBA. (Perhaps, that’s why only Jeremy Tyler considered  going pro when he took his first steps shortly before his first birthday.) Today, Keith Langlois of Pistons.com reported another positive sign about Jerebko’s rehab:

Saw Jonas Jerebko dunk – went up and came down on left leg. It was his right Achilles. FWIW, looked good in impromptu soccer drill.

Don’t expect any setbacks from here, either. Jerebko has spoken with many athletes, including Utah Jazz center Mehmet Okur and Michigan State guard Kalin Lucas, who suffered the same injury. They all shared the same message: when you’re back, you’re back. The injury takes time to heal, but there are no lingering effects once it does.

Jerebko ended his discussion with Alana, who ruptured her tendon a couple months after he did, with some advice: “Good luck with your rehab. Don’t put to much pressure on it.”

Thankfully, Jerebko, who stood for his interview, is well past that stage.

Tags: Jonas Jerebko