Jonas Jerebko next in line as we learn how Lawrence Frank handles rotation

Keith Langlois of Pistons.com:

So has Frank ever considered going a step beyond convention and allowing the rotation – without using any more than the conventional nine or 10 for any single game – to expand to allow for game-to-game flexibility? Could Jerebko be the backup to Jason Maxiell one night, based on either matchups or recent performance, without excluding Villanueva from consideration in the following game?

Consider? Yes. Seriously ponder the viability of such a setup? He’s skeptical.

“In theory, it sounds good,” he said after Tuesday’s practice. “The reality is, it’s hard. You’re trying to search if the certain stars are aligned. If you’re really trying to evaluate it, I’ve always been of the belief that you give guys a sample of games to see what they can get done. I’m not saying you can’t do it and that’s the right or wrong way, but it makes it a whole lot harder. If there’s a certain matchup, then yeah. If there’s a certain element in the game missing, yeah. But it’s very hard. Specialist basketball is very hard. It’s hard to play and it’s hard to coach.”

I’m good with that. Basketball is a sport that requires players to feel in rhythm more than the other major professional sports. If a player deserves a spot in the rotation, he should get a decent amount of time to establish whether he should keep it.

There is a downside to this strategy, though. Lawrence Frank on Austin Daye, via Vincent Goodwill of The Detroit News:

"He’s kind of had stops at each spot. When you look at who’s next to give an opportunity, you have him and Jonas."

Frank chose Daye

That stinks for Jonas Jerebko. In Frank’s mind, rightly or wrongly, Jerebko and Daye are close. But because Daye had the slight edge, Jerebko doesn’t get to play at all. That’s a bitter pill for Jerebko to swallow, but at least he can take solace in that, when he returns to the rotation, he’ll stay for a bit.

Tags: Austin Daye Jonas Jerebko Lawrence Frank